20 Questions To Clarify Your Teaching For 2021

 

Who knows where education is going, but it is not impossible to ask some questions that can guide this evolution.

Next, the following is a collection of complete subjective observations. Well, I don’t think that’s entirely subjective. Or no more. We all see what we will see and interpret how we will do it. What we choose to ‘see’ is as subjective as moving away from that observation. But we have to stop long enough to stop and reflect the machine, so here we are.

In Teach Thought, I see a lot of ‘data’. Number of daily emails. Press Release. Tweets ‘social engagement.’ Newsletter Books, blog posts, headlines, PINs, traffic numbers and clicks (more on this later), conferences, important notes, RSS feeds, social readers, sub-sessions and much more. There is really a lot of this education called public education.

The traditional questions teachers and administrators are facing – and for the foreseeable future – how can we move ‘students’ beyond this level of performance? How do we get every student to read at the grade level? How to get? What can we do to improve parental communication? How can we motivate students? How should I manage my classroom?

But – fingers crossed – that’s the kind of training you get at your school staff meetings, district authorized PDs, and Monday morning emails.

I thought it would make sense to look at the new kind of questions on the faces of education – questions that can either emphasize or detract from school work in a given community. So here’s a man’s (mine). Since learning trends point to a kind of temporary pattern, we may be able to trace the arc of wondering what might happen in the near future.

Questions 20 questions to explain your education for 2021

school. What is the relationship between school and social justice? The fact that it can be considered a ‘trend’ is more relevant than talking about it as a trend, but literacy, equality, race, sex, gender, And even more so is the new relevance of education to theories of rapid change. In history,

modern just as occupation, race, and income are the essence of ‘ethnic issues’ (these are not really ethnic issues, but human issues that make it impossible to separate them in this way), education has saved its untouched image. Seen as a giver. , For some, bad. (See, for example, when the class has become more important than the race.)

Instead of simply emphasizing the need for social justice in schools, it is becoming clear to non-Paolo Frears around the world that education also lies in this cultural abuse. Is. And it’s not just about race, or slapping ‘social’ labels on things, it’s about looking at relationships and linking the chaotic spread of points. The purpose of K-12 cannot be ‘college and career preparation’ which cannot be more ‘word and sentence preparation’ than the purpose of literacy.

Should your classroom discuss or contact current events? it’s fine? Shouldn’t education report massive social change? Light it up? Consider this? Equip us with strategy? Prevent suffering? Help people understand how to live a better life.

Criticism of literacy. Promote strong communities?

  1. What is the role of blended learning and e-learning in educating my students?

Obviously, COVID-19 has changed everything for now and in the near future. What is the role of remote learning, e Learning, and blending learning in your classroom in 2021?

  1. How can I use non-risk assessment and data and data visual tools to improve as a teacher?

critical. Criticism How can I use inquiry to promote literacy?

Tell me another way, how I can help students prepare their questions so that they can make their questions part of the world.

Outside of the classroom, how can I ask students better questions on my own?

education. What is the purpose of education?

What role should cultural issues play in the “classroom”? This problem has been around for thousands of years. The idea of ​​an ‘elite’ education harasses us like a society. Content-based curriculum has a conditioning effect. It contains knowledge, language, image – so many parts of how we think about ourselves and the world around us (as Jamie Boe points out here):

“[C] white and anti-peer culture. Emphasize the implications of the burden of carrying out the duties of, that white students generally have a high standard of academic achievement and are embedded in peer groups that support and encourage academic pursuits. White [student] informants point to the existence of a low-achieving educational culture.In interviews, white students cite peer insults and parental concerns about accompanying children to gift programs. Want to avoid the impression of “aristocracy” 

None of this denies the fact of racial discrimination. It happens – I have experienced it – and it is painful. But it is not a feature of black culture. Rather, it arises from a combination of factors, from social status to school formation. As the economist noted at the end, whites And the notoriety for blacks was revealed by the realization that the “inferior student” was trying to understand the ‘other’, especially the air of superiority or arrogance.

The question then arises, what has to do with what happens inside the classroom and what happens outside the classroom at the ric curriculum level, but the transition from that curriculum to the ‘real world’ Social issues even in the case of?

 How can I make better use of my parents and community members to help my students?

Or better yet, how can I help students do it themselves? Place-based education? Project-based learning?

What should social media do in education?

What about digital footprints? Basically social media. Does it matter if you tweet? How can a hashtag make a difference? Through digital and social media-based activism, tools (hashtags) and opportunities (increase in visibility, if not quantity, increase) over the past few years have largely emphasized both hashtags and social media to address social issues. Be tempted to press. . #Black Live Someter, #Metto, #Crime White, #Ismole Women, and dozens of non-violent, dynamic social media chats consistently link things to something that deserves activity.

The irony here is that those who use hashtags on Twitter – probably on an expensive mobile device – to discuss sharp cultural issues have a wife-to-wife effect, perhaps a lot of digital noise. Maybe, for a little physical action or a fundamental change. Social media is ready for ethical and intellectual publication, which is often very rare in inviting discussions at the joint level.

“Social change is a multifaceted thing,” he said. Who knows what effect X has on Y? It’s a good idea to start asking questions with your students.

 What ‘new’ thing should I include in my teachings?

For example, what is critical literacy code? New Writing Code? Are coders the scribes of our time? How can we support the #block girl score? Thinking about creating coding. There are at least a handful of people who see coding as not just a tech savvy but a basic digital literacy.

What did Maker Ed look like in my classroom? What is Maker Education? What will it look like in my classroom? According to traffic, clicks, and social media responses, many of you have this question.

And that’s pretty good. This tendency of teachers is to create creators and as creators and students as creative spaces as creators and students as creative places where man actually creates something. Perhaps most surprisingly, this trend reflects the subtle feeling through education that perhaps the mastery of educational material is not as good as it seems.

  Allowing only ‘making’ in the classroom, a kind of resignation is made that creation and creation and design are as valuable as telling, reading and reflecting on the priorities set by the teacher.

In place of the maker, the maker is empowered and everyone else becomes the audience. This is not a small shift.

 How can I personally make my education more sustainable?

“Getting bad teachers out of the classroom” is a thing of the past, but wondering why a good teacher can leave is fresh. Teachers have to push to modernize their curriculum, assessment methods, use of technology, etc., especially since this push often contradicts local expectations and one of the most obvious effects is teacher fatigue.

Why did Basel see more than a little tracking through H-Base teachers? That’s all a teacher can do – education is the environment. Students are not products.

 How can I use cloud-based learning tools like Google Classroom to help my students?

What is a ‘development mindset’ and why do I need it?

We’ll get to that soon, but for now, let’s take a look at Jackie Gerstein’s thinking.

we 12 .. When and why should we use video streaming, podcasting and / or related digital media technology?

It’s not about phone calls or emails anymore – there are new (ish) tools that are being adopted by a wider audience.

The other important questions are

ok, many of them are more important than the ones mentioned above, but these are very big questions and I wanted the top 10 or 12 to be a mix of practical and important questions.

 What is the difference between learning and teaching?

How can I read with video and streaming – or with YouTube? What role can video play in my curriculum?

Is Genius Hour something I can use in my standard classroom?

How should we, as industry, update teacher training, and professional development?

How can we provide ‘global education’ while working locally?

How do we know if we are doing a ‘good job’? What if this lesson / unit / curriculum / school / idea is working?

How do I know if I’m a student?

Previous Questions

Why do we teach with technology? (2014) In

other words, tech is a tool vs. tech-for-tech. It’s not necessarily just a 2014 theme, but it seems to have a different tone lately. As much technology as possible in the classroom, but at most, teachers want to know why.

Some of these questions are my lawn lawn push backs, but some are perfectly reasonable, including: “How can we make the best use of technology? How does it work? What’s allowed, promoted and Allows production?

How can I use homework in a modern classroom? (2015)

Letter grade, and ‘with college,’ homework is an icon of traditional education. Alternatives to homework for teachers Developing is a popular idea. A reversed model of reading is a way to reflect on what students do and where they do it, ie, what work students do at home.

Google or Apple or Microsoft – or Does it matter? (2015)

Ah more questions about the iPad, 1: 1, and so on.

When the iPad rolled out in its face years ago in Los Angeles, the hardware cost 30 million. The hardware usefulness of the iPad was called into question – and that’s a problem. The popularity of the iPad in education has always been driven by a little bit of usability, so we’re hoping for some kind of improvement. ے۔

I Pads are expensive mobile devices designed to run apps that appreciate Apple’s environment. That doesn’t excuse them, but the idea that they were plug-in-play designed for classrooms might be bidding.

We’ll talk more about that soon, but in the classrooms, Google specifically and especially the Google classroom moment is gaining ground. In return for its aesthetics and rugged interface, Google’s usability, productivity, and low-cost Chromebook can make school and district arrangements easier, in addition to a key universal sign-in for all Google products.

How do I use digital media and actually use everyone’s power? (2016) The

old media is new again. Who knows where education is going, but it is not impossible to ask some questions that can guide this evolution.

Next, the following is a collection of complete subjective observations. Well, I don’t think that’s entirely subjective. Or no more. We all see what we will see and interpret how we will do it. What we choose to ‘see’ is as subjective as moving away from that observation. But we have to stop long enough to stop and reflect the machine, so here we are.

In Teach Thought, I see a lot of ‘data’. Number of daily emails. Press Release. Tweets ‘social engagement.’ Newsletter Books, blog posts, headlines, PINs, traffic numbers and clicks (more on this later), conferences, important notes, RSS feeds, social readers, sub-sessions and much more. There is really a lot of this education called public education.

The traditional questions teachers and administrators are facing – and for the foreseeable future – how can we move ‘students’ beyond this level of performance? How do we get every student to read at the grade level? How to get? What can we do to improve parental communication? How can we motivate students? How should I manage my classroom?

But – fingers crossed – that’s the kind of training you get in your school staff meetings, district authorized PDs, and Monday morning emails.

I thought it would make sense to look at the new kind of questions on the faces of education – questions that can either emphasize or detract from school work in a given community. So here’s a man’s (mine). Since learning trends point to a kind of temporary pattern, we may be able to trace the arc of wondering what might happen in the near future.

Questions 20 questions to explain your education for 2021

school. What is the relationship between school and social justice? The fact that it can be considered a ‘trend’ is more relevant than talking about it as a trend, but literacy, equality, race, sex, gender, And even more so is the new relevance of education to theories of rapid change. Inhistory,

modern just as occupation, race, and income are the essence of ‘ethnic issues’ (these are not really ethnic issues, but human issues that make it impossible to separate them in this way), education has saved its untouched image. Seen as a giver. , For some, bad. (See, for example, when the class has become more important than the race.)

Instead of simply emphasizing the need for social justice in schools, it is becoming clear to non-Paolo Frears around the world that education also lies in this cultural abuse. Is. And it’s not just about race, or slapping ‘social’ labels on things, it’s about looking at relationships and linking the chaotic spread of points. The purpose of K-12 cannot be ‘college and career preparation’ which cannot be more than ‘word and sentence preparation’.

Should your classroom discuss or contact current events? it’s fine? Shouldn’t education report massive social change? Light it up? Consider this? Equip us with strategy? Prevent suffering? Help people understand how to live a better life.

Criticism of literacy. Promote strong communities?

  1. What is the role of blended learning and e-learning in educating my students?

Obviously, COVID-19 has changed everything for now and in the near future. What is the role of remote learning, e Learning, and blending learning in your classroom in 2021?

  1. How can I use non-risk assessment and data and data visual tools to improve as a teacher?

critical. Criticism How can I use inquiry to promote literacy?

Tell me another way, how I can help students prepare their questions so that they can make their questions part of the world.

Outside of the classroom, how can I ask students better questions on my own?

education. What is the purpose of education?

What role should cultural issues play in the “classroom”? This problem has been around for thousands of years. The idea of ​​an ‘elite’ education harasses us like a society. Content-based curriculum has a conditioning effect. It contains knowledge, language, image – so many parts of how we think about ourselves and the world around us (as Jamie Boe points out here):

“[C] white and anti-peer culture. Emphasize the implications of the burden of carrying out the duties of, that white students generally have a high standard of academic achievement and are embedded in peer groups that support and encourage academic pursuits. 

White [student] informants point to the existence of a low-achieving educational culture.In interviews, white students cite peer insults and parental concerns about accompanying children to gift programs. Want to avoid the impression of “aristocracy” 1.

None of this denies the fact of racial discrimination. It happens – I have experienced it – and it is painful. But it is not a feature of black culture. Rather, it arises from a combination of factors, from social status to school formation.

As the economist noted at the end, whites And the notoriety for blacks was revealed by the feeling that the “lower class student” was trying to understand the “other,” especially the air of superiority or arrogance.

The question then arises, what has to do with what happens inside the classroom and what happens outside the classroom at the ric curriculum level, but the transition from that curriculum to the ‘real world’ Social issues even in the case of?

 How can I better use my parents and community members to help my students?

 

 

Leave a Comment