What Will We Be Reading This Year?

While it’s hard to know what’s on the horizon, these are topics we know we’ll think about in 2020.

Immigration – and welcoming newcomers

Although the story of migration is a human one, in recent years it has become a controversial political issue. In the United States, classroom statistics have changed dramatically, teachers are struggling to help students whose families have broken up, and there are stories of abuse at the border.

At HGSE, Professor Roberto Gonzalez is leading a new immigration initiative at Harvard. As part of the initiative, Gonzalez will work with a team of Harvard researchers from various schools to conduct an impartial research that informs immigration policy. Gonzalez told us,

“The aim of the research is to understand the ease with which immigrants can be included and how to restrict them.It is incredibly useful for policy makers and practitioners on the ground in societies and local organizations. “

” It is my hope that through IIH we can expand this work and make it available to inform key stakeholders. Are. “

There is a series of usable knowledge that schools are welcoming newcomers. We will continue to develop this theme this year.

 

Literacy

The results of the last fall of the NAEP exam were disappointing, to say the least, showing that most reading scores, as measured by the NAEP, were significantly higher despite a combination of reform efforts and government spending.

Fell on This deficiency left experts looking for the culprit – was it balanced literacy? Teaching lesson? How much time did the students spend on the screens? How do we think and evaluate our own test scores? Even so, owning one is still beyond the reach of the average person.

Looking forward to the new year, there are editorial projects in usable knowledge that offer insights and research from HGSE experts on the best modern methods of literacy instruction.

What should students learn – and how should we measure it?

NAEP and other reviews tell part of the story, but what components of learning do they miss? Are there things we should measure but not? However, research shows that there is a correlation between what children are learning in schools and what they need to know in order to be successful in the future.

How can we adjust the curriculum to match? HGSE professor Jill Mehta and teacher Sarah Fine’s 2019 book, Search Dipper Learning, explores the importance of a curriculum that allows for authentic learning – and shows that What does education look like in high schools across the country?

He discussed the subject in depth at Harvard Aid Cassette, which has become one of the most popular podcast events to date. HGSE Professor David Deming also raised the issue, highlighting the importance of collaborative thinking in contemporary workplaces and especially in higher education, the lack of curriculum that has led students to develop these skills. Maybe, writes a New York Times about.

While it’s hard to know what’s on the horizon, these are topics we know we’ll think about in 2020.

Immigration – and welcoming newcomers

Although the story of migration is a human one, in recent years it has become a controversial political issue. In the United States, classroom statistics have changed dramatically, teachers are struggling to help students whose families have broken up, and there are stories of abuse at the border. ۔

At HGSE, Professor Roberto Gonzalez is leading a new immigration initiative at Harvard. As part of the initiative, Gonzalez will work with a team of Harvard researchers from various schools to conduct an impartial research that informs immigration policy.

Gonzalez told us, “The aim of the research is to understand the ease with which immigrants can be included and how to limit them. It is incredibly useful for policy makers and practitioners in societies and local organizations on the ground.” “It is my hope that through IIH we can expand this work and make it available to inform key stakeholders.

There is a series of usable knowledge that schools are welcoming newcomers. We will continue to develop this theme this year.

Digital literacy?

 

From smartphones to smart boards, children and teachers need to go into the digital world every day. But when are children actually taught to use meaning and engage with technology? And who is responsible for teaching them? A study from Project Information Literacy, led by researcher Alison Head, will explore how college students navigate the news and information that the Internet and their devices fill them with – and that How do they decide to trust them?And they should be followed.

This research is particularly important to consider the network of algorithms that now select behaviors and people’s choices as to which products to buy, which news sources to use, and even How do you form your global ideas?

And what does all this digital action mean for children’s privacy and their healthy development? “Unlike us adults, [children] have not yet had the opportunity of childhood and adolescence that is safe. Childhood and adolescence, where they can do mischief, even make some mistakes and get better.

Who They Are, What Marks Them, and How They Want to Be in the World Shearent Hood: Why We Should Think Before Talking About Our Kids Online Leah Plunkett told Harvard Adcast. “And if we’re depriving them of that space, we’re really risking losing them, or at least limiting their ability to become adults.”

Giving trauma and support to weaker students

 

Studies continue to show the effects of trauma on young minds and bodies, as well as on professionals working with trauma absorption groups. But researchers do not have the answers to the questions of how to best help students, practitioners, and societies cultivate resilience.

Paul Racewell, Director of the Education Redesign Lab and Professor at HGSE, says, To take on the challenge of nurturingThose who can succeed and participate in 21st century democracy. At HGSE, the Harvard Advanced Child Development Center, the Education Redesign Lab, and the New Race Initiative are advocating research that supports the development and expansion of trauma-sensitive schools and communities in the United States and around the world. ۔

 

Elections and civic education

Following the impeachment of President Donald Trump after a historic vote in the House of Representatives and a testimony in the Senate, the 2020 election stands as an important sign for the future of American democracy. Still, teachers fear that discussing politics and elections in the classroom could lead to controversy.

Still, teachers need to help even young students develop the critical thinking skills and knowledge needed to participate in the republic.The work of HGSE Professor Mira Levinson on civic education has been successful in the 2016 election cycle, and it will continue to be the case that teachers will continue to talk about democracy in 2020. Discussions in the classroom about ethical and educational dubious ideas, and much more to come in the coming year.

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